secretrepublic:

midrisemixeduse:

I love this juxtaposition on Rue de la Republique in Lyon, France for three and probably more reasons.
Firstly, it’s just a beautiful pedestrian-first street. The surface texture tells you the whole area is for pedestrians, but there’s a curb so some vehicles (for deliveries I think) are allowed down, carefully. Note that the sum of the sidewalk widths is greater than the central thoroughfare width, meeting my 50% rule-of-thumb. Note also that there are no trees on this block (and definitely no grass) proving they are a far from necessary condition for pedestrian comfort.
The two buildings have obviously completely different architecture - in almost every conceivable way - but have almost exactly the same ‘form’, as would be defined in the Building Form Standards section of a good Form-Based Code. Not just obvious massing and placement features like height and a build-to-line, but also the marking of ground floor vs the rest, ground floor permeability and perhaps minimum fenestration. The new building would probably benefit from not having a single large store on the bottom.
Cheekily, I quite like that the new building reflects the beautiful traditional one, almost vanishing as if admitting that the traditional can’t be duplicated or bettered.

Lovely observations, and a great demonstration on the importance of space and form!
-Kasey

secretrepublic:

midrisemixeduse:

I love this juxtaposition on Rue de la Republique in Lyon, France for three and probably more reasons.

  1. Firstly, it’s just a beautiful pedestrian-first street. The surface texture tells you the whole area is for pedestrians, but there’s a curb so some vehicles (for deliveries I think) are allowed down, carefully. Note that the sum of the sidewalk widths is greater than the central thoroughfare width, meeting my 50% rule-of-thumb. Note also that there are no trees on this block (and definitely no grass) proving they are a far from necessary condition for pedestrian comfort.
  2. The two buildings have obviously completely different architecture - in almost every conceivable way - but have almost exactly the same ‘form’, as would be defined in the Building Form Standards section of a good Form-Based Code. Not just obvious massing and placement features like height and a build-to-line, but also the marking of ground floor vs the rest, ground floor permeability and perhaps minimum fenestration. The new building would probably benefit from not having a single large store on the bottom.
  3. Cheekily, I quite like that the new building reflects the beautiful traditional one, almost vanishing as if admitting that the traditional can’t be duplicated or bettered.

Lovely observations, and a great demonstration on the importance of space and form!

-Kasey


secretrepublic:

Why not make alleys places for people?

secretrepublic:

Why not make alleys places for people?


michaelmoonsbookshop:

untrimmed page edges of early 19th century books in original publishers bindings

michaelmoonsbookshop:

untrimmed page edges of early 19th century books in original publishers bindings



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casabet64:

René Gruau

casabet64:

René Gruau

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